Missouri State University
What's happening in the field?
At the Missouri State Fruit Experiment Station

Putting duraline on the raspberry trellises

We use a 12.5 gauge monofilament line – Duraline – for the catch wires on the raspberry trellis. We use gripples to connect the lines and tighten them.

Randy Stout and Jeremy Emery install the Duraline. Photo by Jennifer Morganthaler.
Randy Stout and Jeremy Emery install the Duraline. Photo by Jennifer Morganthaler.
The line is tightened with a gripple and a gripple tool.
The line is tightened with a gripple and a gripple tool. Photo by Jennifer Morganthaler.
Here is a close-up of the metal gripple holding the Duraline together. Photo by Jennifer Morganthaler.
Here is a close-up of the metal gripple holding the Duraline together. Photo by Jennifer Morganthaler.
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Grape phenology and GDD accumulation

GDD base 50 accumulated since April 1 = 372
http://agebb.missouri.edu/weather/reports/gddTable.asp

Phenology stages according to the Modified E-L system
http://door.uwex.edu/files/2010/10/ModifiedEichhornLorennzsystem.pdf

 

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Veggies harvested and raspberries rotated in

Last Friday, May 8, was a nice rainy day – perfect to get things done in the high tunnel! Protected from the rain, we harvested the rest of the lettuce and had to harvest some potatoes a bit early for new potatoes. After the veggies were harvested, the raspberry trellis posts were pounded in, the raspberries in bags were rotated into the space, and the irrigation was re-installed. We are waiting for the next rainy day to install the duraline on the trellis.

 

The second half of the lettuce crop was harvested Friday.
The second half of the lettuce crop was harvested Friday.
The heads are counted and weighed.
The heads are counted and weighed.

 

All the lettuce was harvested.
All the lettuce was harvested.
Some of the potatoes needed to be harvested to make room for the raspberries. We harvested them for new potatoes.
Some of the potatoes needed to be harvested to make room for the raspberries. We harvested them for new potatoes.
After the veggies were out of the way, the raspberry trellis posts were hammered in. Dean (left) and Tom are pictured here.
After the veggies were out of the way, the raspberry trellis posts were hammered in. Dean (left) and Tom are pictured here.
Aaron (right) and Randy are pictured here.
Aaron (right) and Randy are pictured here.
The raspberries in grow bags are rotated into the space. We left some larkspur in the middle that has not bloomed yet.
The raspberries in grow bags are rotated into the space. We left some larkspur in the middle that has not bloomed yet.

 

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Last wine class yesterday evening

We held our last Wine Appreciation class last evening ending with the wine and food pairing. Here are some photos taken last night ending with our group shot. Thanks to Steve Beach and Michael Kovens for helping us with class this year.

Food is served.
Food is served.
And served.
And served.
And served.
And served.
Panning from left.
Panning from left.
To middle.
To middle.
To right.
To right.
There were 4 wines per flight paired with selected foods.
There were 4 wines per flight paired with selected foods.
Some favorite pairings were port and cheesecake and riesling with chocolate chips and strawberries.
Some favorite pairings were port and cheesecake and Riesling with chocolate chips and strawberries.
Here is our group shot.
Our class picture.

 

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Grape phenology and GDD accumulation

GDD base 50 accumulated since April 1 = 248
http://agebb.missouri.edu/weather/reports/gddTable.asp

Phenology stages according to the Modified E-L system
http://door.uwex.edu/files/2010/10/ModifiedEichhornLorennzsystem.pdf

 

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Walnut tree TP-ed over the weekend!

At first glance, it looks like one of the walnut trees at the experiment station was toilet papered in the fashion of a Halloween prank! The tree actually was bagged as part of a walnut breeding project directed by Dr. Chin Feng Hwang. Brigette Williams is the graduate student working on this project with the help of several others includng Li-Ling Chen, Logan Duncan, Surya Sapkota and Steven Turner.

Walnuts are monoecious having separate male and female flowers. Surya and Bridgett are removing the male catkins and then putting a bag over the female flowers to protect them from uncontrolled pollination.
Walnuts are monoecious having separate male and female flowers. Surya and Brigette are removing the male catkins and then putting a bag over the female flowers to protect them from uncontrolled pollination.
The group is working on the cultivar Sparrow which will be the female parent. They will come back to pollinate Sparrow with pollen from the Football cultivar.
The group is working on the cultivar Sparrow which will be the female parent. They will come back to pollinate Sparrow with pollen from the Football cultivar. (left to right – Steven, Dr. Hwang, Surya, Logan and Bridgette)
Dr. Hwang, Li-Ling and Surya are the back of the pickup crew.
Dr. Hwang, Li-Ling and Surya are the back of the pickup crew while Logan climbs the ladder.
Bridgette Williams is the graduate student primarily responsible for this work.
Brigette Williams is the graduate student primarily responsible for this work.
This walnut looks quite spooky after the group has finished bagging it up.
This walnut tree looks quite spooky after the group has finished bagging it up.
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Grape phenology and GDD accumulation

GDD base 50 accumulated since April 1 = 196
http://agebb.missouri.edu/weather/reports/gddTable.asp

Phenology stages according to the Modified E-L system
http://door.uwex.edu/files/2010/10/ModifiedEichhornLorennzsystem.pdf

 

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Thinning shoots in bagged raspberries

We thinned the shoots in the bagged raspberries to 4 to 5 shoots per container. All of the raspberries lived through the winter although one or two may need to be replaced in the future. The work is done for the project funded by the MDA Specialty Crop Block Grant program.

Jennifer Morganthaler holds up the bagged raspberry to show some of the roots growing through the bag.
Jennifer Morganthaler holds up the bagged raspberry to show some of the roots growing through the bag.
We thinned the primocane shoots to 4 to 5 strong shoots per bag.
We thinned the primocane shoots to 4 to 5 strong shoots per bag.
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